Migrants’ Park

Asuka Lee

You and I, in the present, past, or future, are both in the Migrants’ Park.

Each day, we pass by endless waves of new people as we each travel through life. For some, the chance to meet is fleeting, as they are only in our country for a short while – yet have you ever paid attention to listen to their voices? The voices of migrant workers?

Migrants’ Park, a Taiwanese online media platform, specializes in reporting news about new residents and migrant workers in Taiwan. In 2016, it was founded by independent mediaperson Asuka Lee. Despite his poor English and negligible Tagolog, Asuka Lee’s first job in journalism was as a reporter in the Philippines for the Taiwanese multi-lingual media “4-Way News” to pave a bridge between the two island nations.

In 1990, Taiwan relaxed its policies regarding foreign workers and their spouses. Within a generation, the handful of annual foreign visitors have become whole classes of new residents celebrating university graduations throughout Taiwan. The 28 years of integration have been marked by laughter, conflict, tears, and emotion – and many people’s voices were stifled. Foreign residents and migrant workers may be family, friends, colleagues, or even silent pillars supporting the industries – they are key in the function of our society and closely connected to our lives. Journalists like Asuka Lee and his colleagues at Migrants’ Park put these peoples’ stories to words, and continue to bridge us all through a common comprehension.

You and I, in the present, past, or future, are both in the Migrants’ Park.

Each day, we pass by endless waves of new people as we each travel through life. For some, the chance to meet is fleeting, as they are only in our country for a short while – yet have you ever paid attention to listen to their voices? The voices of migrant workers?

Migrants’ Park, a Taiwanese online media platform, specializes in reporting news about new residents and migrant workers in Taiwan. In 2016, it was founded by independent mediaperson Asuka Lee. Despite his poor English and negligible Tagolog, Asuka Lee’s first job in journalism was as a reporter in the Philippines for the Taiwanese multi-lingual media “4-Way News” to pave a bridge between the two island nations.

In 1990, Taiwan relaxed its policies regarding foreign workers and their spouses. Within a generation, the handful of annual foreign visitors have become whole classes of new residents celebrating university graduations throughout Taiwan. The 28 years of integration have been marked by laughter, conflict, tears, and emotion – and many people’s voices were stifled. Foreign residents and migrant workers may be family, friends, colleagues, or even silent pillars supporting the industries – they are key in the function of our society and closely connected to our lives. Journalists like Asuka Lee and his colleagues at Migrants’ Park put these peoples’ stories to words, and continue to bridge us all through a common comprehension.

An education program organized by
The Society of We Are Canadians Too

Venue & Time

Aug 25th
West Corridor Bays  / 12:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Aug 26th
West Corridor Bays  / 12:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Miss Lou’s Room / 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Venue & Time

Sept 1st
Granville 600 / 11:00am – 7:00pm

Sept 2nd
Granville 600 / 11:00am – 7:00pm
Granville 600 / 3:30pm – 4:30pm

Sept 3rd
Granville 600  /11:00am – 6:00pm

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