Fête with the Philippines! – Music Concert

Organizer: Asian-Canadian Special Events Association
Co-Organizers: United Filipino Canadian Associations of British Columbia and The Society of We Are Canadians Too

Taiwan and the Philippines – merely neighbours? Or ancestral relatives?

Sometimes, examining and learning about a different culture ends up shedding a new light on our own, discovering parallels and direct connections we weren’t previously aware of – or simply haven’t talked about! It’s said that the indigenous people of Taiwan’s Lanyu island share the same ancestry as those from Baatan Island in the Philippines, and both languages and cultures remain strikingly similar. The time is long overdue for us to close the distance and pull our neighbours close!

Kicking off the three-day flurry of festivities in style, this year’s TAIWANfest Opening Concert returns to the newly renovated Vancouver Art Gallery Plaza featuring an evening performance like nothing you’ve ever seen! Featuring the music of Vancouver-based Juno nominee Warren Dean Flandez alongside the award-winning Auba Rukai Children’s Choir and the equally talented 13-year-old cellist and classical music fanatic Jamie Chan, experience this glissando of culture and influences – from Canadian and Filipino to Taiwanese and indigenous – the dialogue continues non-stop!

Warren Dean Flandez

Award-winning, JUNO nominated Canadian recording artist Warren Dean Flandez describes his music simply as “songs with purpose”. Born in Yellowknife and calling Vancouver home, Warren grew up singing in the church, steeped in the rich tapestry of gospel music. At the age of 15, Warren began singing lead in a soul gospel choir under the direction of Checo Tohomaso, former backup singer and keyboardist of Marvin Gaye, Lionel Ritchie and the Commodores. It was under Checo’s mentorship that Warren developed his craft through studying the ways of Motown and channeling the essence of soul greats.

Not confined by genre specific stereotypes, Flandez’s latest album Eternally Grateful is a soulfully charged, urban infused gospel that is not only inspirational, but also accessible to mainstream audiences.

Jamie Chan

13 year old Jamie Chan is a self-proclaimed Cello and Classical music fanatic, playing in the Taipei Philharmonic Youth Orchestra. Whether at school or in the orchestra, he has a distinct air of maturity and elegance that is very different from the typical schoolchild.

Playing in the school orchestra from an early age, Jamie has often performed in temple celebrations. The frenzy of celebrations combined with the sophistication of classical music paint a very unique scene in Taiwan and showcases a distinct Taiwanese sound. For Jamie Chan, his cello is his partner. His way to express himself. His way to speak without talking.

“Every time I play the first note, I feel like a hero in the moment.” –Jamie Chan

Auba Rukai Children’s Choir

Voices of schoolchildren echo vividly through mountains and plains, cutting through the humid summer air carrying whispers of a tribe reborn. The Auba Children’s Choir hail from the Rukai tribe in Taiwan, one of countless indigenous groups belonging to the Austronesian family spanning the Philippines, Southeast Asia, and even Madagascar. For this group of elementary school children, choir is more than an extracurricular – it is a means of connecting with their heritage and the language of their ancestors.

Through song, dance, art and crafts throughout the Labour Day weekend, these children are waiting to share their story with you!

13 year old Jamie Chan is a self-proclaimed Cello and Classical music fanatic, playing in the Taipei Philharmonic Youth Orchestra. Whether at school or in the orchestra, he has a distinct air of maturity and elegance that is very different from the typical schoolchild.

Playing in the school orchestra from an early age, Jamie has often performed in temple celebrations. The frenzy of celebrations combined with the sophistication of classical music paint a very unique scene in Taiwan and showcases a distinct Taiwanese sound.

For Jamie Chan, his cello is his partner. His way to express himself. His way to speak without talking.

“Every time I play the first note, I feel like a hero in the moment.” – Jamie Chan

Venue & Time

Sept 1st
VAG Plaza / 7:30pm – 9:30pm

An education program organized by
The Society of We Are Canadians Too

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